SynAtria

Rodent Roller by SynAtriastring(25) "Rodent Roller by SynAtria"

I’m supporting the start-up of a small gaming company called SynAtria and their new video game called “Rodent Roller.This game combines platforming, ball physics, and collect-a-thon gameplay into one fun and unique experience. Important: read below to learn how you will get a special gift from me by supporting an amazing small business.

About SynAtria

The name of the video game company is SynAtria. They combined the words “synapse”, the base component of the brain, and “atria”, the main chambers of the heart. Therefore, their name symbolizes their goals – to make meaningful games with integrity. SynAtria has a big vision of creating whimsical and engaging games. However, without the overstimulating (and often hyper-violent) experience of typical video games.

Founders Trey and Aria Tempest (my son and daughter-in-love) share the positive and negative effects of video games in this video. The games/products developed under SynAtria focus on spreading positivity and supporting mental wellness. They are a determined team to create products with a message and a purpose. SynAtria’s goal is to connect with their players in a very special way by touching upon the minds and hearts of their audience.

Get my complete professional audio library (valued at $119) with a $50 donation to their game campaign.

All donors of $50 to Rodent Roller’s crowdfunding campaign (make sure to pick the Ivan Misner Founder’s Pack) will receive an email with a coupon code within 60 days after their donation. This special code will provide one FREE download of my complete professional audio library (valued at $119) from Misner Audio Programs.

Therefore, consider the free networking and business audio programs as a gift from me, to the supporters of SynAtria. Help them to create amazing new games for the videogame lovers in your life. In conclusion, a win, win, win!  Click here.

your C.P.A.

Do Not Allow Your C.P.A. To Ruin Your Businessstring(46) "Do Not Allow Your C.P.A. To Ruin Your Business"

We are living in a world more connected than ever. However, this hyperconnectivity can create situations when your C.P.A. can effect your business. Working from home can easily lead to a state of “Continuous Partial Attention” (your C.P.A.). This occurs when people are only partially paying attention to others during their online networking or Zoom meetings.  There are some definite pitfalls in our hyper-connected world when we are not giving our full attention to others. Your business relationships and networking may be affected because of your C.P.A. in these three situations.

Monitor your C.P.A. when attending your online networking meetings

Continuous partial attention can hamper your relationship-building efforts – on both a personal and professional level. When attending an online function of any type, it is becoming increasingly common to find people typing away during the meeting. They remain connected to their emails and social media networks during their meeting. This desire can dilute our efforts by driving us to stay “live” online with other things instead of with the person in front of us. You can easily watch them on camera not paying attention to the meeting. Even worse, they fall asleep in their recliner during the online Zoom meeting with their camera live for all to see until they are awoken by another chapter member calling their phone.

Keep your C.P.A. away from your phone 

Speaking of phones. We have probably all experienced being in conversation with someone at an in-person networking function and getting pinged during the conversation. This is happening much more now during online meetings. When we take our attention off what is happening in front of our nose to take a look at what is happening on our phone, we lose the connection with the person who is presenting. We will not remember this part of the conversation well, if at all. And we send a subtle message to this person that he or she does not matter as much as the various pings coming in on our mobile device do.

Our desire to connect and be connected is one of the strengths of business networking. Therefore, when doing online networking, or when we return to in-person events, we will want to effectively be connecting with others. Over the years, I saw people many times on their phones texting during networking meetings, such as at a BNI chapter meeting, a Chamber of Commerce luncheon, or even a gala dinner event.

Be honest: whom do you greet first when you get up in the morning — your spouse, kids, the dog, OR your virtual community? Do you reach for your phone before you even throw your legs out of bed to get up? I have found myself doing that. Consider waiting to look at your mobile phone until after you are ready to receive messages. For me, I wait to turn it on until after I am up, have exercised, showered, and had my breakfast. Furthermore, I think social media is great. I use it regularly to stay in touch and build relationships. But knowing when to focus on your networking and not your phone is extremely important in this digital age.

Do not allow your C.P.A. to distract you when working online

Most of us work from our computers, laptops, or tablets with notifications switched on. Our email, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Teams, and WeChat accounts are sending us notifications. Across your screen, they distract you with their messages. “Look at me! Someone retweeted you! Someone wants to be your Friend!” Even people who do not have ADD are working in a state of attention deficit due to the distraction all these notifications cause.

It is very easy to lose track of whom you have just followed up with. You end up sending your follow-up email twice. You reference something you were discussing with someone else. Worse yet, you send an email to the wrong person entirely. (Who hasn’t done that?) Continuous partial attention keeps you from being alert, attentive, and focused and can hamper your post-event follow up not to mention your day-to-day activities.

Don’t allow your C.P.A. to ruin your business. Continuous partial attention can hamper your efforts to build profitable business relationships with the people you want to connect with. I believe a price is being paid by how this constant connectedness is affecting our real-time relationships. The truth is that our brains are not capable of multi-tasking. Brains don’t work like a computer, which can have many programs running simultaneously. Our minds have to switch among tasks. Some of us can task-switch extremely quickly, seemingly multi-tasking, but we are not actually multi-tasking. Others of us task-switch with a little more difficulty, making it extremely challenging to really pay sustained attention to anything when we try to multi-task.

Frog

The Networking Frog and The Networking Princestring(45) "The Networking Frog and The Networking Prince"

In generating referrals for your business online, you want to network more with a prince and less with a frog. You will kiss a few frogs at first before finding good referral sources. Someday, your prince will come. How can you be sure that you are a networking prince or princess and not a frog?

The Characteristics of The Networking Frog

  • Always asking for referrals, introductions, and favors but rarely reciprocates
  • Does not ask about your business, goals, and ideal customers
  • Often reschedules the appointment
  • Does not return your phone calls and emails
  • Rarely goes out of the way to help you
  • Inconvenienced when complying with your request for assistance
  • Talks excessively about their business
  • Rarely asks you questions and does not listen
  • Quickly turns the conversation back to their business.
  • Their attention is not focused on you with continued eye contact

Make sure that you are not a “Networking Frog” by displaying these characteristics when networking online. Just do the opposite of what a frog does to become a Networking Prince (or Princess).

A Great Example of The Networking Prince

Jerry is always giving referrals and making introductions for his referral partners, many times before they even ask. Jerry is constantly going out of his way to help people with their businesses because he has invested the time and energy to learn what his referral partners are looking for in a potential client. When you talk to Jerry, you feel listened to — he maintains eye contact and focuses on you. You almost have to force him to share about his business and how you can help him. You can count on Jerry to follow up on referrals you send him promptly, and he returns your calls and emails within a day or two. If you run into Jerry at a networking event, he’s greeting new people with a smile, introducing them to others, and just being generally helpful. After an encounter with Jerry, you feel like royalty!

Identifying if someone is a networking prince or frog can be difficult in your first meeting. It takes time to discover someone’s networking nature. Therefore, know and look out for the characteristics of a networking frog. Sometimes networking frogs pretend to be royalty at online networking events. Their scales and warts reveal themselves later in follow-up interactions with them. While networking online, you will kiss a few frogs before finding the true princes (and princesses). Just make sure that you are not being a Networking Frog yourself. Pattern your networking skills after my friend Jerry, and you will become known far and wide, throughout the land, as networking royalty.

positive

Pursue Positive Actions For Positive Rewardsstring(44) "Pursue Positive Actions For Positive Rewards"

The concept of Givers Gain® is a principle related to the law of reciprocity, a social-science theory that a positive action results in another positive action, which potentially rewards both parties as well as having a ripple effect that continues to help other people.

Giving has many cultural and legal differences around the world. In some cultures, it’s viewed negatively. It is ultimately a positive societal force that can be applied in every business regardless of location or culture. What’s important in acts of giving is our motivation.

The motivations that fit with the philosophy of Givers Gain

  1. We give because we understand that in a community, what we do affects what others will do, and we all benefit.
  2. We give because we know that in the same situation, others would do the same for us.
  3. We give because we want to give back where we have profited.
  4. We give because when we work together, we get bigger and better results than working on our own.
  5. We give because we enjoy it.

Having an ethical motivation is key to giving. You can easily justify giving once, but giving over and over again requires a motivation that’s understood not only by you but also by those you surround yourself with. Adopting one or more of the motivations above will help you stay grounded.

Positive giving in business changes lives

Allen is a commercial real estate agent in Orange County, California. A number of years ago, Allen met with as many businesspeople as he possibly could using his network. The more people he met, the more he was able to become a super-connector for the local business community. He was generating a ton of business for the local economy simply by making connections and giving the gift of a referral.

He even won awards for it and became the star of his group. He was recognized as having the most one-to-ones, and he also gave out the most referrals. Allen focused on building relationships. Once he was convinced he had found a good business opportunity for both of his contacts he would often phone them on the spot and put them together, thus creating a powerful introduction much more likely to lead to business.

When I asked him how all of this activity had affected his business at a bad time for real estate, he said, “I am completing the best year in my 26 years in the business.”

Giving in business, as in life, works in many positive ways

Take David, who runs a fantastic print business offering a brilliant service, great value, and reliable delivery. If you ever try to pay him a compliment, he’ll offer a sheepish smile and an explanation that he was only “doing his job”.

Just up the road from where his business is based is the area’s largest independent hotel. He is a trusted supplier for this hotel. After turning around an order on a particularly short deadline, the hotel manager exemplified his gratitude. He offered David a meal for two at the hotel’s restaurant as a way of saying thank you.

David graciously declined the offer and instead asked for something else — to take the call of one of his other clients, a commercial designer, and project manager named Suzanne. Suzanne had recently asked for help, and David decided to use this opportunity to get her the introduction that her business needed. The introduction was made, business was done, and both of David’s clients were happy.

In the true spirit of giving, Suzanne’s additional revenue has allowed her to take on larger development projects, which David now prints for. The local subcontractors she uses on these projects have increased revenue and now come to David when they are in need of his products, becoming ambassadors and referrers for his business. The cycle of giving continues to benefit him and those around him.

Acts of giving change lives. Acts of giving can be powerful in business regardless of the size. We can give many things.

The types of giving that make a real impact in a business community

  1. Give a referral opportunity between two other businesses you know (maybe a supplier and a client).
  2. Give mentoring to a business that needs your expertise.
  3. Give your knowledge to local business groups.
  4. Give to local education and youth community groups.
  5. Give to the elders of the community.

All of this giving activity is part of an eco-system. It will come back and benefit you and those you care about in a positive way. You can choose how to practice Givers Gain in whatever way is right for your business. The more this happens, the more energy can be given to important global social concerns. Infinite giving allows us to focus on the bigger picture, on living in a world of plenty where resources are plentiful and suffering is scarce.

fear

Frozen by Fear or Focused by Fearstring(33) "Frozen by Fear or Focused by Fear"

The time you focus upon your networking efforts will improve on the connections that you would like to turn into stronger relationships. Take the time to reach out to your closest colleagues and see how they are doing. Find out if there is anything you can do to help them. You may not be able to help everyone but you can help someone. Talk to them about how you are doing and ask for help that you think they may be able to provide. It may be moral support or it may be referrals to assist your business.

I don’t know what our future holds but I do know that we can influence it and the best way to influence it is to embrace the relationships that you’ve established over the years. Today, more than ever, you need your network. You need people around you to help and support you. You can get frozen by your fear, or focused by your fear, and your network is a beacon of hope in a sea of fear.
cheese

Big Block of Cheese Daystring(23) "Big Block of Cheese Day"

Anyone who has known me for long, knows that I loved the TV series, West Wing.  It was television at its best.  One of the episodes introduced the “Big Block of Cheese Day” concept to many people, myself included.

The idea stems from a situation in 1835 where U.S. President, Andrew Jackson, was given a 1,400-pound block of cheese from a grateful dairyman. The gift was delivered to the White House which was a decidedly mixed blessing.  It was a wonderful gift, but it was also 1,400 pounds!!!  Jackson didn’t know what to do with all of this cheese so, he opened the doors of the White House for the public to come in and take some of the tasty (and according to some accounts, smelly) cheese for themselves.  Apparently, thousands of visitors came to the White House and dispatched the massive block in just a few hours.

The TV series had a couple episodes where they took this concept further and required that all the top staff meet with public citizens to listen to topics that they wouldn’t normally embrace.

BNI Founder’s Day

That tradition has motivated me to do a “networking variation” of the idea.  On the third Thursday of June every year, I’m going to have a “Founder’s Day”.  On this day each year, I will book at least 16 individual 1-2-1’s with BNI members from around the world.  The purpose is for BNI members to ask any business or networking related questions they would like to run by me during their 25 – 30 minute 1-2-1 with me. If you are a BNI member, I invite you to complete the form included in this blog. We will select the best responses from many places all around the world.

Business owners and professionals, have you invited your team or your customers to have a conversation with you or ask some questions? It can be a great way to build and strengthen your business relationships. Even without the cheese.

CLICK HERE TO SUBMIT YOUR 1-2-1 REQUEST WITH DR. IVAN MISNER

BNI Founder’s Day = Thursday, June 24, 2021 from 9:00am – 6:00pm CDT

THIS COMPLETED REQUEST FORM MUST BE RECEIVED BY MAY 21, 2021.

I’m sorry, you have missed the deadline. The opportunity for BNI members to submit their request for a 30-minute one-to-one with me has passed. Please try again next year.

 

deep

Is Your Network a Mile Wide But an Inch Deep?string(45) "Is Your Network a Mile Wide But an Inch Deep?"

Is your personal network deep or shallow? Chances are, it is a bit of both. A shallow network is where all of the people you meet will start, and where far too many of them will remain. In the course of developing your network, you meet and learn a little about lots of people. However, you don’t go much deeper. You don’t know much more than the superficial things about these people — their names, their jobs, and maybe one or two other small facts about them.

A deep network contains the contacts that you know much more about, and who usually know much more about you. The question is, how strong is the deep part of your personal network? It’s great to have a large network, but if it is a mile wide with tons of people in it with no deep relationships (or very few of them), it will never be powerful.  To maximize the relationship, you want to know as much about that person as possible. You want to find out about their family, their hobbies, their interests, etc.

You need both a wide and a deep network

One of the masters of developing a deep network is entrepreneur, author, and speaker Harvey Mackay. It is truly amazing how much information Harvey asks for — and retains — when he decides you are someone he wants to have in his deep network. When I met him for the first time, I remember having a nice conversation. The second time I had a conversation with him, he started up with the following:

  • So, how are your kids?
  • You’ve got three, right?
  • What’s Ashley doing now?
  • What’s Cassie doing now?
  • And how’s Trey doing?
  • Is he about ready to go to college?

I was flabbergasted. How did he remember all that? The more I spoke to him, the more I realized he must have taken notes. As it turns out, that’s exactly what he does. To help him deepen important relationships faster, he takes careful notes about things important to the people who are important to him. Harvey Mackay carefully catalogs that information and adds to it every time he meets with someone, with things such as children’s and pets’ names, your birthday, the anniversary of your business — tons of information.

Harvey Mackay developed a great method that helps him deepen relationships. To be successful at building a powerful personal network, you need to develop a method that works for you. We live in such a sound-byte society. After a simple, “Hi, good to see you again”, so many people jump right into business without getting to know the other person. That’s too bad because one of the things I’ve found is when you get to know somebody, amazing things happen.

The GAINS Exchange

One of the best ways I’ve ever seen for shallow — or casual — business relationships to deepen is through a tool called the GAINS Exchange. Looking back, I remember the first time I introduced the GAINS Exchange into my business. GAINS stands for “Goals, Accomplishments, Interests, Networks, and Skills”. I wrote these five elements on a paper so that two people who meet for the first time — or who had met only briefly and had a shallow relationship — could take turns learning about each other’s GAINS and writing them down.

Build trust with deep connections

Guess what happened? They had known each other casually for a year in a networking group — and had never done business with each other. Within three months of discussing their GAINS, they began passing referrals to each other. This began because they found out they were both soccer coaches, and that made a deeper connection between them that led to trust. If they had continued with their more “shallow” relationship, they may have never passed a single referral. It’s really fun to see two people at a GAINS Exchange that start out learning about each other on a business level by asking each other the following questions:

  • What do you do for a living?
  • Describe what your business is like?
  • What are you looking to do to grow your business?

Then, one of them shares something unique, like an unusual hobby or an unusual place they dream of traveling to see, and conversation just takes off.

If your network is a mile wide and an inch deep, it will never be very powerful. You need a strong and stable network that is both wide and deep. Like the supporting roots of a huge oak tree, some of your referral relationships need to go deeper. You create deeper relationships by learning as much as you can about other people. You want to find out details about their family, their interests, and their goals. Get to know them a little bit better to learn what is important to them.

Growing Forward Together

Growing Forward Together™string(27) "Growing Forward Together™"

The global business world experienced many challenges with growing forward during “The Great Pause of 2020”. Last year was the most difficult economic time worldwide since the Great Depression. However, BNI® not only faced these challenges but thrived during the global pandemic. BNI’s Global Leadership Team focused on finding solutions instead of focusing on the problems. It is amazing that I love what BNI is doing for our members and I love what our CEO, Graham Weihmiller, is doing with this company.

Growing Forward Together™

Watch the first part of this video about BNI’s innovative programs from last year and what they achieved during “The Great Pause of 2020”.  Then, watch the second part of this video for announcements about upcoming BNI global initiatives, programs, and events as we enter “The Great Acceleration” phase of 2021.

The Great Pause of 2020

For over 35 years, BNI was the leader in hosting weekly local in-person referral networking meetings worldwide.  However in March 2020, for the safety of our members, BNI paused over 9,500 in-person BNI meetings and transitioned these to an online virtual meeting platform: BNI online.  This maintained business continuity and allowed our 275,000 BNI Members worldwide to support their fellow BNI Members during the pandemic. In 2020, our BNI chapter members passed over 11.5 million referrals which generated over $16.3 million(USD) of global business revenue for each other. Here are a few more of BNI’s innovative programs from 2020:

The Great Acceleration of 2021

BNI is a Beacon of Hope in a Sea of Fear

Today, now more than ever, you need your network and you need to be networking with them.  You need a team of people who will be there to help you during difficult times.  During 2020, many people became frozen by their fear.  However,  I also saw many people became focused by their fear.  They were focusing on surviving and thriving because “BNI is a beacon of hope in a sea of fear”.

Since 1985, BNI has created over $130,000,000,000 USD in revenue for BNI Members via over 130,000,000 Referrals. Today, the average BNI referral results in over $1,000 in revenue. And we’re just getting started. Your local BNI community can give you, and the people that you know, the support you need to thrive. Our BNI members are growing forward together. Today, more than ever, you need your network. Today, more than ever, you need BNI.

The Godfather of the Networking World

The Godfather of the Networking Worldstring(37) "The Godfather of the Networking World"

The latest edition of SWAGGER MAGAZINE named me “The Godfather of the Networking World” (hey, I’m glad no one’s calling me the “Grandfather of Networking”). Swagger Magazine is a premier modern men’s lifestyle magazine. They focus on everything men love; gear, tech, fashion, rides, sports, health, fitness, and food. Furthermore, Swagger magazine features Men and Women who possess “swag”. This month, they featured my self-made story. I guess I possess SWAG.

The Godfather of the Networking World

He speaks on good authority – as founder of BNI (Business Network International). Over the past thirty six years, he has watched his organization grow to more than 10,000 chapters in 70 countries, making BNI the largest business networking organization ever created. Dr. Misner is a much sought after speaker, having addressed audiences around the globe.

Use this link to read the article about relationship networking, the history of BNI, being an author, and how to build relationships: www.swaggermagazine.com

Thank you Swagger Magazine

    • Drew Williams
    • Stephen Foster
    • Dave Gordon

Please visit www.swaggermagazine.com for more features and more men’s luxury content and gear!

If you would like your SELF MADE story of success to be told, contact info@SwaggerMagazine.com

Today, more than ever, you need your network. You need people around you to help and support you. Become a beacon of hope in a sea of fear. 

Networking Quotient

Build Your Referability Degree and Networking Quotientstring(54) "Build Your Referability Degree and Networking Quotient"

Today’s guest blog is an extract from the book, “Networking Quotient” by my good friends and BNI® Leaders, Paulo Corsi and YP Lai, about two immensely powerful measurements that determine the ability of your network to generate business for you, your Networking Quotient and your Referability Degree.

As a networker, have you ever asked yourself how effective your network is in bringing business referrals? And have you ever pondered which strategy will bring you better results? Should you expand your network and get to know more people? Should you build a deeper relationship with the people who are already in your network? Well, the secret to getting the answers is being able to measure your network. That sounds simple, right? However, what is the right measurement to use? The size of your network? The depth of your network? Or perhaps something else?

Let me introduce you to two powerful measurements that determine the ability of your network to generate business for you.

Your Referability Degree

The Referability Degree points out how much of your network is working for you. However, it does not tell you if your network has the right size to generate more business opportunities for you.

The Referability Degree is calculated by dividing the number of contacts in your network who have given you a referral in the last six months and dividing this number by the total number of contacts you have. (e.g., 30 people that gave you referrals / 100 people in your network gives you a Referability Degree of 30%).

  • If you have a Referability Degree of 50% or less:

Your focus should be on developing better relationships with the people who do not regularly give you business referrals. Through nurturing the relationship, you will teach them how to generate referrals for you. At the same time, you will be learning ways on how to create value and bring referrals for the other person and develop a long-term mutually beneficial relationship.

  • When your Referability Degree is above 50%:

You are ready to expand your network. As you expand your network, you should simultaneously strengthen the relationship so that both parties can bring good quality business referrals for each other.

Imagine a person that has a Referability Degree of 90% – which is exceedingly high. However, the size of the network is only 10 people. This indicates that he has deep relationships with his existing contacts but has only an extremely limited network. In this scenario, he must expand his network to more people. A network of 10 people will not be sufficient to create a constant flow of opportunities for him.

Your Networking Quotient

The Networking Quotient is simply the number of people that have given business referrals to you in the past 6 months.

For a continual flow of business by referrals, it is recommended to have a Networking Quotient of at least 100. This means having an active community of at least 100 people that you are constantly in contact with, build rapport with and know how to bring you good quality referrals. Building up your Networking Quotient takes time, and with constant practice, it will become your daily habit.

“Networking Quotient”

Networking Quotient  Paulo Corsi and YP Lai in their book, “Networking Quotient”, share in detail how to calculate the Referability Degree and the Networking Quotient. And more importantly, they share proven strategies to build your Referability Degree and your Networking Quotient.

The eBook / Kindle version of “Networking Quotient” is on sale for $1.99 until 11 pm (PDT) TONIGHT – April 1st, 2021.

 Download the eBook version of “Networking Quotient” today.

 

“Work Less Earn More”

Work Less Earn More

Accompanying the Networking Quotient book, YP Lai has written another book, “Work Less Earn More” about the 10 proven strategies to be wealthier, healthier & happier.

This book acts as a guide for busy entrepreneurs to get their lives into harmony, ensuring that while they are in pursuit of material wealth to provide for the family, they also focus on other important things in life like health, fitness, and happiness.

The eBook / Kindle version of “Work Less, Earn More” is on sale for 99¢ on Amazon until 11 pm (PDT) on April 2nd, 2021.

Download the eBook version of “Work Less Earn More” today.

Misner's Corollary

Misner’s Corollarystring(24) "Misner’s Corollary"

I learned about Murphy’s Law in graduate school. It basically says that what can go wrong will go wrong. Although this tenet feels very pessimistic, there is value to it. It gives a framework for people to look for flaws in their thinking, which can make it easier to address potential issues before they arise. This leads me to Misner’s Corollary to Murphy’s Law: Sometimes, what can’t go wrong will go wrong. I know this sounds crazy and even more pessimistic, but if you go about it in a thought-provoking manner, you can truly think through potential challenges before you proceed. In particular, you want to consider what I call the “unintended consequences of a seemingly good idea.” This tends to happen when you roll out what everyone agrees is a good solution while avoiding what could go wrong with its rollout and implementation. You then roll out the idea, and all goes well. But we tend to overlook the unintended consequences of that new idea.

Misner’s Corollary Examples

This has happened several times in my career, such as when my company, BNI, implemented a “substitute program” relating to attendance. The idea was that the substitute would represent the member (employees and customers were the prime substitute candidates), and then the member wouldn’t be considered absent. It sounded and looked good on paper, but there was a long-term unintended consequence: Some members would look for virtually anyone to be a sub. This created a less than satisfactory situation for the group, especially when that sub basically just pitched their own business instead of representing the person they were supposed to be there for. It has taken us years to address this issue, and it’s still not perfected.

Another example of the impact of unintended consequences was BNI’s transition from paper copies of referral slips over to digital referrals. Despite the massively improved process of passing and tabulating the information, there was a sense of loss by many members in the physical passing of a referral to another member. This turned out to be moot once the pandemic arrived and all our groups transitioned to meeting online, but it does underscore one of the problems with Murphy’s Law and Misner’s Corollary — you never know for sure if something would have been an issue when the problem never really had a chance to surface (which is probably a good thing).

There have been some occasions where I’ve witnessed these strategies produce clear-cut results. Last January, our CEO, Graham Weihmiller, began to transition 10,000 weekly, in-person networking meetings online. He expected pushback early on, and therefore started the transition where it was first necessary (Asia) and experimented in areas where it was not yet necessary. By moving forward and testing the waters, the organization was well prepared for unintended consequences, resulting in an incredible global pivot over a matter of weeks.

The prevailing lesson here is that when you have a good idea, think about what can go wrong with that idea. Then, spend time thinking outside the box about what can’t go wrong by considering potential unintended consequences. Maybe then you’ll avoid encountering Misner’s Corollary for yourself.

cannot remember

I’m sorry, I cannot remember your namestring(40) "I’m sorry, I cannot remember your name"

What do you do when you meet someone and you cannot remember their name? That can be embarrassing. I have observed this many times over the years during networking events. I have also observed the different ways others have dealt with forgetting someone’s name. Some have just faked it by engaging in a conversation hoping to get a clue. They try to remember where the other person was from or how they knew them. On the other hand, I have heard people come right out and say, “Hey, I’m sorry I forgot your name” or “I’m sorry I do not remember where you’re from”.

In this video, I share a story from one of my blog readers which describes a scenario of this very nature and I answer his question of what I would have done if I were in the same sticky situation.

What not to do when you cannot remember a name

If it happens to you, I recommend that you do not say, “I’m sorry, I forgot your name” or “I don’t remember where you’re from”. I have found that people sometimes take it personally that you can’t remember them. No reason to embarrass yourself and embarrass them because you don’t know who they are. They might begin to avoid you because you did not recognize them earlier.

Finally, you do not want to say, “Nice to meet you”. Even if you do not remember meeting the person, they clearly know you, so you are most likely not “meeting them” for the first time.

What to do instead

When you forget someone’s name, I recommend saying, “Hi, good to see you”, then strike up a simple conversation to help you remember based upon the current situation or event you are attending. Starting a dialogue is a great way to shake up the gray matter in your head to try to remember who they are. If you still cannot remember after conversing a while, it’s time to stop trying and move along. Before leaving tell them, “Hey, it was nice to see you again. Gotta run. Talk to you again next time”.

It can be challenging to remember names, especially if you’re an avid networker. Years ago, I was told about a four-step process that will help you to remember people’s names–and it actually works!

OK, not remembering someone’s name has happened to me too. Saying “good to see you”, then engaging in a dialogue is a great approach to remember their name. If you absolutely do not want to use this technique, a fall-back approach can be one that someone once shared with me: “Sorry, I’m having a total ‘Senior Moment’ and I don’t recall where we’ve met”. Feel free to use that if you do not feel very brave with the “good to see you” approach. However, be prepared for some bruised feelings.

If you’ve ever been approached by someone and drawn a complete blank trying to remember their name, or even where you know them from, you know how awkward and embarrassing that situation can be. Finally, always wear your name badge when networking in person so that the people you meet can easily remember your name.

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