Moving from the Office to the Networking Scene

In this video, I talk to my friend Sarah Owen, referral marketing expert and Master Franchisee for the Referral Institute in the UK, about her real-life tips on making the move from the office into networking events.

Professionals in business are truly professionals because they’re great at their chosen career, but they often don’t look forward to getting out of the workplace and networking.  The thing is though, professionals can actually be pretty good at networking . . . they just have to make the choice to get out of the office and go out and meet people.

After watching the video, please share your feedback on Sarah’s tips in the comment forum below and, even better, share a few tips of your own . . . what do you do to motivate yourself to get out and network?

Easing into Networking

Professionals in business are truly professionals because they’re great at their chosen career, but they often don’t look forward to getting out of the workplace and networking.  In this brief video, I talk to Sarah Owen, referral marketing expert and Master Franchisee for the Referral Institute in the UK, and she offers some real-life, highly effective, and simple-to-implement tips on making the move from the office into networking events.

Do you have any tips or suggestions to add to what Sarah talks about in this video?  If so, please share them with us in the comment forum below–thanks!

To find out more about the Referral Institute, please visit: www.ReferralInstitute.com.

Are You Using Networking Tools Effectively?

The Second Law of Notable Networking: Learn How to Use Networking Tools Effectively
(Click Here to read about the First Law of Notable Networking)

A Notable Networker must have and use the right tools to network skillfully.  All professionals need the tools of their trade to conduct business.  A painter needs a brush, a teacher needs a blackboard, and an administrative professional needs a computer.  To achieve success, networkers need their own tools as well.   Good networkers’ tools include:

  • name tags to identify themselves to others,
  • card holders to carry their business cards, and most important,
  • card files to carry other people’s business cards.

It has been said that the U.S. Chamber of Commerce coined the term “networking.”  Over the years, I’ve gone to many Chamber of Commerce business mixers.  Unfortunately, too many of them seem to practice a passive form of the technique.  However, depending on the chamber, some mixers can be an outstanding way to meet many new people.  At Chamber of Commerce mixers, people from a variety of businesses get together with the idea of meeting one another.

At these meetings, I often encounter people who don’t wear a name tag.  Of those who do, many neglect to put their company name or profession on the badge.  I can’t imagine anyone going to a business meeting and not telling everyone what business he or she is in!  You’ve got to let people know who you are and what business you’re in if you want to reap the full rewards of networking.

I also run into people who don’t have any business cards with them.  Business cards are one of the most inexpensive forms of advertising available and a crucial tool for networking.  They should be well designed and present a professional image.  Most important, you need to have them in your possession!  A large stack of cards sitting in the desk drawer at your office doesn’t help much at a business mixer.  Always carry a small card case full of business cards with you and keep a large box of business cards in the glove compartment or trunk of your car for restocking your card case on the spot.  Use the backs of any cards you get from others to make notes that will jog your memory about each individual or about the conversation you had.

In addition, you should go a step further and carry a vinyl or leather card-carrying case or book for the cards of the people you network with.  These are people in your own personal network of contacts, people who presumably are storing your cards and referring you as well.  Always keep three or four of their cards so you can hand one to anyone interested in their services.

One way to enhance your networking efforts is to use computer software.  When you get back to your office, you can enter the new names and information you’ve acquired into a contact management program to help you organize your information and enable you to easily handle follow-up activities.  In addition to these, several general database programs, such as Relate2Profit, provide contact management capabilities.  You can log in new information and contacts, get reports of your progress, and reminders.  If you’re not already using a program such as this, rest assured that the learning time is a couple of hours or less.

Do you have a favorite networking tool or a particular software program that you’ve found to be especially useful in enhancing your networking efforts?  If so, please write about it in the comment forum below–I’m always interested in hearing about new tools for increasing networking effectiveness. Thanks!

 

“Never Apply for a Job Again: Break the Rules, Cut the Line, Beat the Rest”

Earlier this year, I was asked by Darrell Gurney (pictured below) to write the foreword for his new book, Never Apply for a Job Again: Break the Rules, Cut the Line, Beat the Rest, and I gladly agreed for two reasons.  First, Darrell walks the talk–he completely understands the importance of building genuine relationships in networking and he is the epitome of a master networker.  Second, I believe this book is an invaluable tool for people across the globe in forging new career paths, especially in our current economic climate where the competition for jobs can be a huge challenge for the majority of people.

Today is the official book launch for Never Apply for a Job Again, and I highly encourage you to visit the book’s website and watch the short videos on the site which explain what the book is about and how it can help people worldwide use networking to secure jobs without struggling through the conventional, highly competitive job application process.

In short, the book outlines the way for professionals, new graduates just starting out, returning military folks, and all others to approach an uncertain job market with certainty by knowing and being known by the people who have the power to launch careers.

 Darrell teaches how to:

  • Break outside of limiting “rules” by which you unconsciously live in relation to networking
  • Meet people, be memorable, stay top-of-mind, and maintain connections with influential door-openers
  • Employ ten, time-tested principles for launching an effective “stealth” career campaign
  • Have your fascinations and passions lead to research and relationships
  • Network like a pro, regardless of whether you’re an introvert or an extrovert
  • Conduct backdoor meetings to gain massive referrals
  • And more . . .

80% of all jobs are filled before they are ever advertised and this book is the solution to being left in the dark and not getting a chance at the unadvertised jobs.  To quote Darrell, “The most effective career-enhancement tool since humans arrived on the planet is the good opinion and favor of others.”

If you want to learn more about how to advance your career by leveraging the good favor of others whom you’ve built genuine relationships, visit the Never Apply for a Job Again website by clicking here.

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