“Never Apply for a Job Again: Break the Rules, Cut the Line, Beat the Rest”

Earlier this year, I was asked by Darrell Gurney (pictured below) to write the foreword for his new book, Never Apply for a Job Again: Break the Rules, Cut the Line, Beat the Rest, and I gladly agreed for two reasons.  First, Darrell walks the talk–he completely understands the importance of building genuine relationships in networking and he is the epitome of a master networker.  Second, I believe this book is an invaluable tool for people across the globe in forging new career paths, especially in our current economic climate where the competition for jobs can be a huge challenge for the majority of people.

Today is the official book launch for Never Apply for a Job Again, and I highly encourage you to visit the book’s website and watch the short videos on the site which explain what the book is about and how it can help people worldwide use networking to secure jobs without struggling through the conventional, highly competitive job application process.

In short, the book outlines the way for professionals, new graduates just starting out, returning military folks, and all others to approach an uncertain job market with certainty by knowing and being known by the people who have the power to launch careers.

 Darrell teaches how to:

  • Break outside of limiting “rules” by which you unconsciously live in relation to networking
  • Meet people, be memorable, stay top-of-mind, and maintain connections with influential door-openers
  • Employ ten, time-tested principles for launching an effective “stealth” career campaign
  • Have your fascinations and passions lead to research and relationships
  • Network like a pro, regardless of whether you’re an introvert or an extrovert
  • Conduct backdoor meetings to gain massive referrals
  • And more . . .

80% of all jobs are filled before they are ever advertised and this book is the solution to being left in the dark and not getting a chance at the unadvertised jobs.  To quote Darrell, “The most effective career-enhancement tool since humans arrived on the planet is the good opinion and favor of others.”

If you want to learn more about how to advance your career by leveraging the good favor of others whom you’ve built genuine relationships, visit the Never Apply for a Job Again website by clicking here.

The #1 Question You Should Be Asking Yourself

It’s a given that we all want to be happy and successful in whatever career path we choose to follow–but how do we get there?  The path may be different for each one of us, but the #1 question we should be asking ourselves in order to set out on the correct course for achieving happiness and success is the same for each of us . . .What is my passion?

In this video, presented by Applied Transformation, Inc., I talk with Roger Green about the overwhelming importance of identifying your passion, following your passion, and then always looking for opportunities within that passion.

What is your passion?  Have you identified it yet?  If so, are you currently following it?  If not, what are some ways you can think of to change course in order to start following your passion?  Remember, it’s never ever too late to start following your passion. 

I’d love to hear your comments about this topic and what your experience has been related to it–please leave your feedback/thoughts in the comments section . . .

Making a Mark with Marketing . . . How Are You Making Yours?

Marketing isn’t something I was always confident about.  When I first started out in business, my degrees were in Political Science and Organizational Behavior.  I had very little marketing experience until I went to work for a transportation company in Southern California and, within a two week span, went from a role in purchasing to a significant role in marketing–a huge change that was an even bigger learning experience.

My marketing experience was trial by fire and reading.  I just started reading books on marketing and learned as I went, and it was that experience that gave me enough knowledge to do some marketing on my own when I later set out as a business consultant. 

If somebody had asked me when I was 25 where I saw myself career wise in thirty years, I would have had no clue that my career would be all about marketing . . . that I would be the Chairman of the world’s largest referral marketing organization.  Sometimes we go places in life we never expected to go but I wouldn’t change a thing about the career path I chose.  I am passionate about helping people grow their businesses and achieve great success through effective referral marketing and after spending over two decades devoted to this work; I really enjoy knowing that the work I do allows me to pass on the marketing knowledge and experience I’ve attained in order to benefit to others.

I was recently asked what my top marketing tip would be and I think it’s really all about building the brand–either the brand of the company or of the individual, depending on the kind of business that you’re in.  Name recognition–that’s the biggest challenge, especially for small companies.  It’s not the same for everybody because every business is a little different and people’s skill sets are different.  For me, in my business, brand building has largely been about writing.  Before the internet I was trying to get articles in newspapers and magazines.  Now it’s much, much easier.  In this age of blogs and social media, even small companies have a global reach.  The problem is all the white noise that’s out there: with so many people wanting a piece of the action you have to be able to stand out.  So, for me, the top marketing tip would be to write, write, write.  Become an expert in your field so people want to follow you because when they follow you, they’re more likely to do business with you.

I’d love to hear how you’re making your mark with marketing–what is your top marketing tip for the other business owners out there reading this blog?

 

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