Four Behavior Styles

Four Behavior Styles (the video)

There are Four Behavior Styles you will find in others when you are networking. Do you know your behavioral style? Please watch this video to learn about these different styles.

In the book Room Full of Referrals which I co-wrote with Dr. Tony Alessandra and Dawn Lyons, we offer insight into the following four different behavioral styles:

Go-Getters: (Driven, Bold, Decisive, Strong Desire to Lead)

Promoters:   (Energetic, Outgoing, Fun-Loving, Positive, Talkative)

Nurturers:   (Patient, Helpful, Understanding, Sentimental, Reserved)

Examiners:   (Effective, Efficient, Thorough, Research-Oriented)

If you pay careful attention to the behavioral characteristics of others, you will improve how you communicate with them effectively by adapting to their style.

app

The Networking Scorecard™ App

Now, the power of networking smarter comes to your smartphone for free.

In this comprehensive app, your mobile device now becomes your networking tool. You will discover strategies that go beyond collecting business cards and turn networking into a profitable resource for your business. Dive into this FREE app based on the book. Discover how the most successful networkers leverage their brand, expertise, and customers to achieve greatness in life.

The networking scorecard app is a way of measuring the kinds of things that you should be doing. It is a way of tracking your networking success. In the networking scorecard app, you track the kind of things that you need to be doing in order to achieve success in networking. These things include sending a thank you card, calling someone in your networking and having a conversation, arranging a one-to-one meeting, attending a networking event, setting up some kind of activity to connect with people, giving a referral, and sending an article of interest. In conclusion, there are a whole lot of things that you can do to track your networking scorecard, and they are part of the mobile app.

So if you are doing things that are listed in the networking scorecard app, then you’re mining your network. Although it may take time, you’re doing the things necessary to generate the business. With the networking scorecard, you know you have to do a certain number of these things in order to get business. Furthermore, it’s a way to track and feel better about the activities that you’re conducting.

Features of this amazing app:

FREE

  • Track networking activities like thank-you notes, meetings, calls, events, and referrals
  • Earn points to track your networking skill level and performance
  • View weekly networking activities at-a-glance
  • Set up a customized networking calendar
  • Access resources, worksheets and templates from Dr. Misner, Brian Hilliard, BNI, and Asentiv designed to help you get the most out of your network.
  • And most importantly, measure if you are Networking Like a Pro!

 

In business, you achieve what you measure.  The Networking Scorecard™ App provides you with a mobile solution to measuring your networking efforts. If you’re ready to build connections that turn relationships into profitable customers, this mobile app is for you!

Are you having problems signing up for “The Networking Scorecard”?

 We have released a patch to resolve the issue that users with certain phone number formats were facing when signing up for the Networking Scorecard App. Please update the app and try the sign up again. For those who have previously downloaded it and you were experiencing problems, you will need to update it then sign up again.

You may go to the App Store and update or click this link and update:

https://itunes.apple.com/in/app/the-networking-scorecard/id1318616340?mt=8

Download the free app now

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.networking.scoreboard

https://itunes.apple.com/in/app/the-networking-scorecard/id1318616340?mt=8

Paul Furlong

Planning Your Networking (by Paul Furlong)

Paul Furlong shares his networking tips in this video.

Most people are disappointed with their networking results at networking events because they did not have a clear strategy for how they were going to be networking. Paul Furlong, BNI Director Consultant, shares his networking strategy questions:

There are so many different networking events. It is important to decide which ones should attend. Use the following questions to help you to decide which events to attend.

  1. Why do you want to go to networking events?
  2. How are you going to network?
  3. What are you going to do to build the relationships with those you meet at the networking event?
  4. Do you know the type of businesses are you wanting to network with?
  5. What networking events do these businesses you want to meet attending?

Now that you have decided which event to attend, here are a few tips on how to network at the event.

  1. Ask the host for a list of who is attending to determine who to approach.
  2. Determine if they are in it for the long term relationship you desire or if they are only transactional when you meet them.
  3. Be prepared to network with your business cards, brochure, and appointment calendar.
  4. Talk as little as you can about your business and ask them what is currently happening in their work.
  5. Share a succinct story if asked about how you help others and share who are your ideal referrals.
  6. Schedule a second meeting to follow-up and learn more about each other.
  7. Send an email after the event to confirm the second meeting and thank them for meeting with you.

Rule the World

Great story-telling is essential to effectively communicate your ideas in order to inspire and influence your audience. In this show, Paul Furlong, Creative Director at Opus Media, deconstructs world-class story-tellers from all echelons of society. Digging deep, Paul attempts to find the recurring and unique principles they use to help you make your stories more engaging and better communicate your ideas to stimulate your audience to take action.

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/podcast/rule-the-world-the-art-power-of-storytelling/id1164974213?mt=2

Desperate Networkers

Four Desperate Networkers

Desperation is not referable. When people demonstrate certain behaviors as part of their networking efforts, it’s a tell-tale sign of desperation. Here are four types of behaviors that desperate networkers exhibit:

Click here to watch this video

The Card Dealer

This is probably the most common form of desperation that I’ve seen over the years. The Card Dealer is a person that darts around the room passing out cards like they’re at a poker table. They don’t spend time really getting to know anyone (unless they think they can get something from them). To the Card Dealer, networking is mostly a numbers game. The more people they can pass their cards to – the better they’re doing (or so they think). Card Dealers tend to have a network that is a mile wide but an inch deep because they don’t spend time building relationships. It never works in the long-run and they just look inexperienced, frazzled, and yes – desperate.

The Space Violator

Here’s the guy that thinks the closer he gets when he’s talking to you, the more you’ll be interested in what he’s saying. Nope. Not true. In fact, it has the opposite effect (especially if his breath has the aroma of a smelly camel). So, what’s the right distance to stand from someone without getting into their personal space? The answer to this question varies based on the cultural standards of the country you are in. In North America, it’s fairly common to have conversations at roughly “arm’s length” for people that you meet at a networking event. From my experience that distance is definitely less in some countries around the world. What’s also interesting is the issue of gender and personal space or “proxemics.” According to a “Journal of Psychology” study, “male-male pairs tend to interact at greater personal distances, whereas female-female pairs tend to interact closer.”

The Premature Solicitor

This is the person who confuses networking with direct selling. They meet you and immediately go into sales mode. They want you to do business with them without asking questions about you, your business, your interests, or your needs first. To this person, everyone is a target and every target is a dollar sign. These people are the reason why many individuals don’t like to go to networking events. They go to meetings and feel slimmed by people soliciting them for business. They leave the meeting and run home to get a shower.

The New Best Friend

Follow-up with the people you meet at a networking event is important. But be a professional – not a stalker. The New Best Friend is the over-eager seller who after you meet at a networking event – calls you, emails you, social media messages you, and tries to become your New Best Friend in the space of just a few days. Generally, they’re not actually trying to help you – they simply want to sell something to you. Granted, they may want to sell something to you because in their mind – it’s only to “help you,” but it’s never really about you. It’s about what they want from you. Desperation seeps from their pores. I’ve experienced this many times over my career. The one that stands out the most in my mind happened a couple years ago. I met a young man (late 20’s) at a networking event and he went right into “New Best Friend” mode – calling several times, emailing every day, messaging me on Facebook etc. But when he wrote me and said that he thought of himself like my son (yes, seriously – he said that) and he needed my help in his business venture – I had to pull the plug. I tried to pull it gently by talking about the importance of establishing credibility before pitching something and that the process of developing credibility takes time. Curiously, my “new son” abandoned me.

Desperation is not referable. Remember these behaviors when you go to networking events and whatever you do – don’t demonstrate these behaviors yourself. Remember that networking is more about farming, than it is about hunting.

Networking Up

Networking Up: Connecting with Successful People

We’ve all heard the advice: “you become the people you hang out with”. This means that you need to surround yourself with successful people (however you define success). Plus, you also need to be networking up to raise the bar for yourself over time. Having run the world’s largest business networking organization for more than three decades, one of the things I’ve learned is that: There’s generally room at the top.  It’s the bottom that’s really crowded.  So how do you start networking above your weight class to move your way up? Here are seven things I recommend that will help you accomplish that goal.

One of the most important endeavors for our professional success is also one of the most confusing and daunting for so many. That endeavor is “networking up” – connecting in a meaningful and memorable way with those who are at a higher level of success or whose influence and connection could potentially change everything for your business.

Finally, remember that if you’re always the most successful person in the room, you’re hanging out in the wrong rooms.  Take these five suggestions and start “networking up” to the right rooms.

holiday office party

Networking At The Holiday Office Party Can Be Tricky. Here’s How To Do It Right.

Ah the holiday office party . . . Free food, open bar, and a chance to get a glimpse of your company’s most elusive executives letting loose a little.

The holiday party is a great time rub elbows with the upper echelons of your company, but, especially in big corporations, it can be hard to make an impression. Here’s how to ‘network up’ and get face time with your busiest bosses that can lead to career opportunities in 2018.

Ten Tips for “Networking Up” at Your Holiday Office Party:

Don’t be a suck up.

Executives appreciate knowing their work makes a difference but don’t “puppy-dog lick” them to death. Instead, share a specific story about how their big wins this year helped someone or made a difference in the work you do at the company.

Don’t assume they remember you.

In bigger companies, don’t assume executives know about the work you do for them. Always help them out by giving them context on what your role is, “Hi Mr. Jones, It was so exciting to be in charge of our contract with XYZ company this year, my team in the x department had a lot of fun working on that one.”

Listen More Than You Talk.

Remember that a good networker has two ears and one mouth and should use them both proportionately! Ask questions. Some suggestions: How did you start in business? How did you grow the business or the department? What were some of the challenges with…? Have you read any good books lately? (My favorite (after talking for a while) is: How can I help you?)

Do Your Research.

Now, this is critical, DO YOUR RESEARCH. Before the party, find out who you want to talk to and what they’re currently interested in. Ask them what project they’re most excited about working on in 2018 and invite them to tell you about it.

Add Value.

If you can find a way to add value to their work, you’ll be remembered. For example, I had the opportunity to talk to Richard Branson, I asked him about his latest endeavor and asked if it would be of value if we did a short video interview so that he could share the program with my audience. He loved the idea, and we shot the video for my blog.

Remember to always “honor the event.”

This is really important! Make sure when networking at a holiday party – or any non-traditional networking event – that networking is supplementary to the reason people are there, so don’t treat it like a business mixer. Be aware of the primary focus. Don’t act as if you’re in the boardroom giving a presentation, keep it natural and leave them intrigued. The real emphasis must be on ‘finesse’ at a holiday party. Yes, it is a great networking opportunity – but, if you overtly sell yourself or your efforts, you may turn people off! After all, it is a holiday.

Responsible consumption.

Don’t Have More than a Couple Drinks. It’s a party, but it’s not YOUR party. You don’t want to be stinking of liquor when you approach the people you want to connect with. Impressions count. Make the right one.

Embrace discomfort.

When networking with powerful company execs, feeling nervous is normal. Plus, it’s usually a sign that this is the exact person you should be talking to.

Don’t Go Negative.

Whatever you do, don’t go negative. I know that sounds obvious, but it happens all the time, especially if you’re nervous. Don’t complain about how busy you are, how the bartender messed up your drink, or how bad the traffic is getting to work. You want to be remembered, but not as the person who is always negative.

Be confident of your value.

Introducing yourself to an executive can be an intimidating experience, so give yourself an informed pep talk. Before the event, make a list of the things you have done over the past year and understand how what you do may integrate into discussions. Once you’ve got this down, there’s no reason you shouldn’t feel good about yourself. Consider how what you’ve done can integrate with their interests.

The truth is, that if you believe that networking is about building relationships – then you can network anywhere, anytime, and anyplace – as long as you honor the event and focus on building relationships and not merely conducting transactions.

International Networking Week 2018

International Networking Week 2018®

International Networking Week 2018® is an initiative of BNI®. International Networking Week 2018 will feature a number of networking events across the world!

The 2018 International Networking Week® is just around the corner. Are you prepared to build a powerful personal network by inviting a diverse group people to your networking meeting from February 5 through 9, 2018? Check out the promo video for next year’s International Networking Week®. #BNIINW18

Are you planning on participating in International Networking Week®

Join us for the 11th Annual International Networking Week® on February 5-9, 2018

This Year’s International Networking Week Theme: DIVERSITY!

Networks are by nature “clumpy”. We tend to surround ourselves with people who are like us—but that’s not the most powerful kind of network. People tend to cluster together based on education, age, ethnicity, professional status, etc. Therefore, when we surround ourselves with people who have similar contacts it may be difficult to make connections with new people or companies with whom we desire to do business. The more diverse your network, the more powerful it is. It’s the people who are not like you who can connect you to a completely new “cluster.”

One of the most important keys to being successful at building a powerful personal network is diversity. A diverse personal network enables you to have people in your circle as connectors to other people in communities where you may lack contacts.

Please watch this video to learn more…

The goal of International Networking Week® is to celebrate the key role that networking plays in the development and success of businesses across the world. Simultaneous events will be held globally to celebrate International Networking Week®. For more information or to promote your local networking event please see internationalnetworkingweek.com

The Networking Scorecard™ App provides you with a mobile solution to measuring your networking efforts. If you’re ready to build connections that turn relationships into profitable customers, this mobile app is for you! The map can be downloaded from the Google play store. However, the app will soon available in the Apple Store for iPhones. GET THE MOBILE APP on Android or Sign up for the soon-to-be-released Apple version

Networking Up

Networking Up! Five Ways to Connect Above Your Weight Class

We’ve all heard the advice: “you become the people you hang out with”.  This means that you need to surround yourself with successful people (however you define success). Plus, you also need to be networking up to raise the bar for yourself over time.

Having run the world’s largest business networking organization for more than three decades, one of the things I’ve learned is that: There’s generally room at the top.  It’s the bottom that’s really crowded.  So how do you start networking above your weight class to move your way up?  Here are five things I recommend that will help you accomplish that goal.

Hang out where successful people are.

We are all at a different place in our career, so start by assessing where you are and then determine where you can go to “network up.”  When I was new in business, that meant joining a local service club like Rotary, Lions, or Kiwanis.  Organizations like the Chamber of Commerce and BNI are also excellent ways to start networking up.  Later, I added boards of non-profit organizations and charities to my list.  Many successful people play in these areas.  What a great way to connect with these people in a professional environment.

Embrace discomfort.

If you’re not uncomfortable connecting with someone, then you’re not aiming high enough. I’ve been there.  I understand this feeling. However, you need to get past that and go talk to them.  Your discomfort may be a sign that this is the exact person you should be talking to.

Work within the context.

If at all possible, find a way to connect what is happening at the moment to something interesting in your discussion or setting.  For example, I met a well-known international thought leader for the first time at a book signing for speakers at a conference.  The problem was that the audience was still at dinner, and no one was at the signing!  So I shared a story with him about a book signing I did where the only person who showed up was my mother.  She acted like she was a fan and made such a big deal at the signing that people started crowding around my table.  It was an incredible embarrassment that turned into a huge success.  He laughed so hard that it helped him remember me well enough to invite me to join a professional organization that meets regularly around the world.

Find out what they’re currently interested in.

This is a critical item.  If you know they are going to be at an event, do some internet research to find out what they are currently working on, then open up your discussion by asking them to tell you about it.  If you haven’t done the research – ask them what they are working on that they are most excited about.

Add value. 

This is the most important item.  If you can find a way to add value – you’ll be remembered.  For example, the last time I had the opportunity to talk to Richard Branson, I asked him about his latest endeavor at the time – The “B Team” or the Business Team.  When I asked him about it, he was pretty excited with the program. I asked him how I could help him with it.  While he was thinking, I asked if it would be of value to him if we did a short video interview so that he could share the program with my audience.  He loved the idea, and we shot the video about the B Team program for my blog.

Finally, remember that if you’re always the most successful person in the room, you’re hanging out in the wrong rooms.  Take these five suggestions and start “networking up” to the right rooms.

"Networking Don'ts"

Networking Don’ts

Over the years I have shared lots of advice on how to grow your business by building relationships. During my last “Ask Ivan” Facebook Live event, I shared many of my recommendation on what to “do”. Now, I want to share four common “Networking Don’ts” mistakes to avoid when you’re networking if you’re looking to grow your business.

Don’t sell or pitch to them!

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve met someone for the first time and they start “selling to me.” I’ve seen the same thing when I’ve been with other business people far more successful than me. Don’t do it! The old adage – “it never hurts to ask, right” is completely wrong when you are networking up with someone for the first time. A lot of people do it – don’t be one of the crowd.

Don’t complain to them.

I know, that sounds obvious, but I’ve been both the victim of it and I’ve seen it. I was standing with an incredibly successful businessman some time ago when he was meeting people in a crowd when someone he just met went on a rant about some problem with the man’s company. He stood out and was quietly escorted out. You want to be remembered, but not for that.

Don’t be a sycophant.

There are plenty of people to flatter them, so don’t “puppy-dog lick them” to death. Successful people are, however, still people, and they appreciate knowing their work makes a difference. I have found that if I share a specific story about how their work or business has really helped someone in some way, they truly appreciate the comment. That way the conversation is not all about me, and at the same time, it acknowledges them for the work they’ve done.

Don’t assume they remember you next time.

If you meet them or connect with them again, never, ever, assume they remember you. Always help them out by giving them context on how you know each other or met. Really successful people tend to meet hundreds, if not thousands, of people. Giving them context helps them jog their memory. If you meet them in person, give them a reminder of where you met. For example, when I am networking up with an email communication, I’ll send a copy of a photo of the two of us from the event where we met. That always jogs their memory.

Finally, remember that networking can become your most powerful tool, but only if you approach it properly. Networking should be effective for most businesses. If it has not worked for you, then maybe you are following some of the “Don’ts” I listed above.

Diversity

Diversity and Networking

Diversity in your personal network enables you to increase the possibility of including connectors or “linchpins” in your network. Linchpins are people who in some way crossover between two or more clusters or groups of individuals; this allows them to link groups of people together easily. The best way to increase the number of possible connections in your network is to develop a diverse network – not a homogeneous one.

The truth is when it comes to networking – not having a lot in common with someone may mean that they can be a connector for you to a whole world of people that you might not otherwise be able to meet.

Networks are by nature “clumpy”

(that’s the technical term). It is human nature to congregate with people that are very much like us. People tend to cluster together based on education, age, ethnicity, professional status, etc. When we surround ourselves with people who have similar contacts it may be difficult to make connections with new people or companies with whom we desire to do business.

If you wish to build a powerful personal network – branch out. Build a diverse network of professional contacts that include people that don’t look like you. Finds others who do not sound like you, speak like you, or have your background, education, or history. The only thing that they should have in common with you and the other people in your network – is that they should be really good at what they do. Create a personal network like that, and you’ll have a network that can help you succeed at anything.

active

When Networking, Are You Active or Passive?

Networking is a contact sport, it requires people to get out there and actively and strategically build relationships. What exactly does that involve? What defines “active” networking? This is actually a great question. It opens up a discussion about not only what it means to be an “active” networker but also what it means to be a “passive” networker.

Active Networking:

You invite other people to one or more of the networking organizations you belong to, carry several of the business cards of your members with you all the time, and above all, refer your members to others whenever you have an opportunity to do so.
 X
Active networking also means having a reciprocal relationship with others. We prefer doing business with people who do business with us. Why give your business to someone who’s not willing to return the favor? There are hundreds, maybe thousands, of competent, dependable business professionals in your area who provide any given product or service. They don’t have to buy something from you to reciprocate. They can join one of your networking groups, carry your business cards, or simply refer you to people looking for your product or service.

Passive Networking:

You use other people as a resource occasionally but for some reason cannot actively network with them. It may be because they represent a narrow market where you have no way of assisting. Perhaps they’ve told you they’re not interested in participating in any networking organizations. Are they located too far away to refer to them regularly?
Now that you know the difference between active vs. passive networking, strengthen your networking strategy by pinpointing one person this week with whom to actively and strategically build a stronger relationship. What can you do to begin to form a connection with them? I welcome your questions and comments.
Desperation

Desperation is Not Referable

When people demonstrate certain behaviors as part of their networking efforts, it’s a tell-tale sign of desperation. There are four types of behaviors that desperate networkers exhibit. Please check out these links below that describe each of these four types of behaviors that desperate networkers exhibit:

There are four types of behaviors that desperate networkers exhibit.

Click on these links to find out more about each:

Are You a Desperate Networker?

Remember these behaviors when you go to networking events and whatever you do – don’t demonstrate any of these behaviors yourself.  Remember that networking is more about farming than it is about hunting. Generally, these people are not actually trying to help you — they simply want to sell something to you. Granted, they may want to sell something to you because in their mind it’s only to “help you,” but it’s never really about you. It’s about what they want from you. Desperation seeps from their pores.

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