Givers Gain

Givers Gain®

If you bring people into your network who embrace your core value, you will create an amazing network. Incorporating the philosophy of Givers Gain ® into my organization was one of the things that have really set BNI aside from the other networking groups. We have inculcated this core value into the fabric of BNI. Therefore, “Givers Gain ®” became part of the very DNA of the organization. That is incredibly special.

Years ago, I was sharing those words with a well-known business consultant and friend.  He was going to be speaking at a big BNI conference the next day. He listened to me and said, “Oh Ivan, you know that’s not true, am I right? You know that the Founder of every organization thinks that some key philosophy is embraced by most everyone in a company. It is really not so” I told him, “No, it really is inculcated into the DNA of the company.  Most everyone knows it in BNI. Don’t believe me – confirm it yourself.  Ask your audience about it tomorrow.”

So, the next day, during his presentation, he stopped and said “Oh, I have a question for you, what’s the philosophy of this company?”  He then heard a resounding, “GIVERS GAIN!”

He was astonished and said to me, “Ivan, do you know how incredible it is that almost everyone in an organization at all levels of that organization understand the company’s guiding core value?  Do you?

I understand how amazing that is. Therefore, I do not take it for granted.  It is one of the things that make BNI special.  “Givers Gain®” is BNI’s principle core value.  It is based on the age-old concept of “what goes around comes around.”  Furthermore, if I help you, you’ll help me – and we’ll all do better as a result of it.

In conclusion, he owed me dinner that night based on a little wager we had.

LCD's

Specific is Terrific with LCD’s

Weekly networking presentations with LCD’s

It is very important to be prepared to introduce yourself by breaking down your business into your LCD’s (Lowest Common Denominators). Each week, create a business educational curriculum to train your sales force to focus on just ONE aspect of your business.

For example, each week just focus on:

– A service
– A product
– A benefit

When you want to nail a presentation, start by explaining your lowest common denominators, or the most immediate, universal value of your business. Your LCD is your secret weapon.

Click on the graphic below, or click here, to see this video. Learn more about developing this training approach for your weekly presentations.

Apron

Put On An Apron.

There were a fair number networking groups around when I started BNI in 1985.  However, they were either really mercenary or too social.  I knew the only way BNI could stand out as a networking organization is by having a genuine focus on giving first and getting second.

Years ago, a brand new BNI member shared with his local BNI Director that he had just had an epiphany.  “You know,” he said, “this whole concept of Givers Gain, and helping other businesses so they help you, it’s a little bit like taking off your bib and putting on an apron. I have lived my profes­sional career trying to find ways to close deals and get what I want in business by having others help me. I think I’ve missed the point. Networking is really about trying to find ways to help other people. You take off that bib and put on an apron, you help others and they will help you.”

When I started BNI, I focused the meetings on building relationships by helping others first and that’s what the philosophy “Givers Gain” is all about. This philosophy is a standard that we should all apply to ourselves and how we behave with other people, not a stick we use to get someone to do something we think they should be doing. If you bring in other people into your network who embrace and employ this core value, you will create an amazing and powerful network.  Therefore, take off that bib and put on an apron!

 

 

Four Behavioral Styles

The Four Behavioral Styles (the video)

There are Four Behavioral Styles you will find in others when you are networking. Do you know your behavioral style? Please watch this video to learn about these different styles.

In the book Room Full of Referrals which I co-wrote with Dr. Tony Alessandra and Dawn Lyons, we offer insight into the following four different behavioral styles:

Go-Getters: (Driven, Bold, Decisive, Strong Desire to Lead)

Promoters:   (Energetic, Outgoing, Fun-Loving, Positive, Talkative)

Nurturers:   (Patient, Helpful, Understanding, Sentimental, Reserved)

Examiners:   (Effective, Efficient, Thorough, Research-Oriented)

If you pay careful attention to the behavioral characteristics of others, you will improve how you communicate with them effectively by adapting to their style.

Seuss

Dr. Seuss’ Birthday – NEA Read Across America Day

Today, March 2nd is the birthday of Dr. Seuss.

Today the BNI Foundation is supporting the National Education Association’s “Read Across America Day”. Therefore, go find a classroom and volunteer to read a Dr. Seuss story to the students. For example, in this video, I share a story about reading to my kids when they were younger, the Dr. Seuss classic, “And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street“.

Dr. Seuss’s very first book for children! 

Originally published: December 21, 1937

From a mere horse and wagon, young Marco concocts a colorful cast of characters, making Mulberry Street the most interesting location in town. Most noteworthy, Dr. Seuss’s signature rhythmic text, combined with his unmistakable illustrations, will appeal to fans of all ages. Finally, who will cheer when our hero proves that a little imagination can go a very long way. Now over eighty years old, this story is as timeless as ever.

Blessing

“How Can I Help You” Leads to Blessing     

by Ivan Misner & Beth Misner

Last night Beth and I were at a black-tie event together. We were milling around in the ballroom lobby with about 600 other guests, waiting for the grand doors to open, when Beth noticed a diminutive lady looking around as if she were lost.

“I think she needs some assistance,” she quietly said to me. When she got closer to us, Beth caught her eyes and smiled reassuringly.

“Excuse me,” she said breathlessly.

“How can I help you?” Beth asked her.

“Can you tell me, please, who is in charge of the event?”

Instead of simply pointing to the ballroom and telling her that the event organizer was inside preparing the room for the attendees, Beth shot a quick glance over her shoulder as if to say, “Just go with it,” to me, and gestured to her to follow us. The three of us started to move toward the closed doors.

It was then that I noticed she was wearing a press pass. A cameraman with a video camera and gear bag slung over his shoulder was trailing along behind her.

What was this?

We entered the ballroom and gave the large hall a quick look-over. No organizer. Understanding that it would not do to just leave her and her cameraman in the room, we invited her to come up to the very front.  We showed her the table where the organizer could be found later on in the evening.

“I’m from a Chinese news affiliate out of New York,” she told us as we walked together to the front of the room. Now, it just so happened that my third book to be translated into Chinese, Masters of Sales, had been released the past week in the Chinese market. Beth simply could not resist the temptation to share that with her, as well as a friendly “nie-hou-ma,” to which she responded with great delight.

She then asked if it would be okay for her to interview me at the front of the room while we waited for the event organizer and the CEO of the event we were there to attend.

Hmmm, let’s see.

I paused for exactly a nanosecond before responding that it would be more than okay: “shiea-shiea,” Beth said, bowing slightly.

She spent the next 15 to 20 minutes interviewing me. We discussed networking tips, my new book, differences between American and Asian businesses, and a little bit about BNI. Please watch a segment of the interview below.

Therefore, it goes to show you that you just never know where that simple phrase: “How can I help you?” is going to lead. How have you used this phrase, and found that something fortuitous has happened?

My First Business

My First Business, a personal story

Beth and I own a property management company (this would be a good story to share someday). We’re in Galveston setting up a new property for lease. Therefore, we were walking through a Home Depot to get what we needed to make the property ready to lease. We were walking by these house numbers and out of the blue, she started this video about my first business.

As a 14-year-old, I started my first company to help a neighbor sell his stick-on house numbers he manufactured. I took over his sales of reflective numbers and I hired a sales team. However, I did so well, I made him tired and he consequently went out of business

Please watch this video about how I eventually launched my entrepreneur spirit by the numbers.

http://ivanmisner.com/the-p-r-i-c-e-of-referrals/

The P.R.I.C.E. of Referrals

The PRICE system is a commonly known management tool for tracking performance in a business context.  People who want to track, analyze, and manage their performance or the performance of others can use this system as a tool for accomplishing that. Many members of BNI have asked me about tracking the referrals they receive.  The PRICE system can be an excellent tool for you to manage and assess your referrals in BNI.  Furthermore, the system can be applied to individual members or the progress of an entire Chapter, whichever you prefer.

PRICE is an acronym for Pinpoint, Record, Involve, Coach, and Evaluate.  

Pinpoint – involves determining the general theme(s) of the goals and objectives that you or your Chapter may have.  It may be as simple as the total referrals you wish receive.  It can however, be more specific by breaking it down into inside or outside referrals (referrals from members or from people that members refer).  You can even decide to track referrals by the actual value of the referral.

Record – involves taking your goals and putting them in measurable and observable terms.  Measurable terms include things such as quantity, quality, or time frame.  This part of the process involves tracking your goals in writing.  It requires that you take the actual quantity or value of the goals you have established over a time period that you determine (we recommend one year) and record them as they occur.

Involve – requires clear communication and providing feedback to the other members of your Chapter.  Share your PRICE goals or develop Chapter PRICE goals that can be distributed and discussed at the Chapter.  Discuss progress over time and make sure to review and discuss your PRICE goals regularly.

Coach – is one of the most important parts of a successful PRICE system.  Share your PRICE goals with your local Director.  Ask for their feedback.  Use the live internet BNI-Yahoo Chat site and bulletin board to get feedback on your program (see page ______ for more details).  Ask the Leadership Team of your Chapter for assistance, seek out a mentor from your Chapter to help you (or volunteer to mentor someone else).

Evaluate – involves summarizing the data after a year to take a look at your progress.  Make sure to recognize your successes and determine future strategies to improve performance.

The best management tool in the world – is the one that is used regularly.  There is no magic to setting and tracking performance.  It is accomplished using simple but specific methods that are used consistently.  Success is the sum of small efforts that are repeated day in and day out.  Tracking your success – is done the same way.

International Networking Week 2017

Welcome to International Networking Week 2017

Ivan Misner welcomes you to and officially opens the 2017 International Networking Week with this video. Please share this video in your BNI chapter meetings this week. For more information about International Networking Week, please view our website and watch the video at http://internationalnetworkingweek.com/

The Top Characteristics of a Great Networker (pt 1)

Many people offer advice about what it takes to be a great networker (myself amongst them).  One thing that is left out of that equation, however, is what other people think about what it takes to be a great networker.  Networking involves interacting with others. So what do “they” think it takes to be a great networker?  This is important because we all need to be cognizant of other people’s expectations and adjust our behavior accordingly if we want to make the kind of impression that will work to build a powerful personal network.

Recently, I took the opportunity to gather almost 3,400 survey responses from business people around the world.   I gave them a list of almost 20 different characteristics on networking and I asked them to pick the top behaviors they’d like to see.  From those responses, I have identified the top characteristics of what people believe makes a great networker and have listed them here.

  1. Good Listener. At the top of the list is being a good listener.  Our success in networking depends on how well we can listen and learn. The faster you and your networking partner learn what you need to know about each other, the faster you’ll establish a valuable relationship. A good networker has two ears and one mouth and should use them both proportionately.  Listen to people’s needs and concerns and find opportunities to help them.  You can’t help others if you don’t know what they need, and you find that out by listening. In many ways, networking is about connecting the dots but to do that you have to listen so that you can help people make the connections they are looking for.
  1. Positive attitude. The first thing that people see from you is your attitude, how you take things in general. A consistently negative attitude makes people dislike you and drives away referrals; a positive attitude makes people want to associate and cooperate with you. Positive business professionals are like magnets.  Others want to be around them and will send their friends and family to them.
  1. Helps Others/Collaborative. People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.  Helping people shows that you care.  One survey respondent said that “people want to network with individuals who have a collaborative attitude.”  Helping others can be done in a variety of ways, from clipping a helpful article and emailing it to someone, to putting them in touch with a person who can help them with a specific challenge.  Several respondents commented about not wanting to network with people who are “in it for themselves.” A willingness to collaborate and help others is essential as it builds trust and helps establish a strong relationship.

Check out my blog next month for more characteristics of what people believe makes a great networker.

John Maxwell interview

John Maxwell Interviews Ivan Misner on “Networking”

In this video, I discuss with John Maxwell about checking your checkbook and calendar priorities and how to build your business by building relationships. I also share how I reverse engineer my goals.  Finally, we discussed coaching vs. mentoring and “Farming vs. Hunting”. Please click on the photo below to watch the video of my personal interview with John Maxell.

 

John Maxwell interview

John Maxwell Interviews Ivan Misner

Ivan Misner on “Networking” from The John Maxwell Team on Vimeo.

 

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