Alex Mandossian Verb

What is Your Verb?

I just spent the five days at my semi-annual TLC (Transformational Leadership Council) event in Mexico.  I come away from each of these conferences with nuggets of great information.

At this conference, one of the presentations that gave me a lot of great nuggets was from my friend, Alex Mandossian.  His talk was called “Discover Your Verb.”  OK, I thought it sounded a bit weird but his content is always so great, so I didn’t care – I had to be there.  I’m glad I was.  It was in fact, amazing.

In his talk he said, the “biggest lesson I’ve learned over the years is the one thing that makes a great business person and leader is: movement!”

Albert Einstein once said that “nothing happens until something moves.” This is true in business and in leadership because without movement, change is not possible.

Alex told the story of a legendary ad man, Leo Burnett from Chicago.  He said that “Burnett once put his staff to the task of analyzing 62 ads that failed to move merchandise. Why did they fail?  Burnett said it was due to too many adjectives because adjectives (like “extremely”) don’t move people, instead they spark skepticism and doubt in our minds.  In fact, of the 12,758 words of those failed ads, 24.1% were adjectives! Translation: more adjectives means less movement.”

Alex said that in comparison, Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address contains only 13.1% adjective-to-total-word ratio and Churchill’s “Blood, Sweat and Tears” speech has 12.3%.

If adjectives are the problem, then what is the solution?  Alex said that it’s not nouns – it’s about verbs or action words.

Verbs increase persuasion power and move people according to Alex.  The greatest thought leaders in history lived their lives as verbs.

For example, Alex said: “Rene Descartes is “Father of Western philosophy.” His verb was: THINK! (“Cogito ergo sum”) “I THINK, therefore I am!”

  • Einstein believed if you stop learning you start dying. His verb was: LEARN!  “I LEARN, therefore I am!”
  • Maria Montessori believed in teaching philosophy that bears her name today. Her verb was: TEACH!  I TEACH therefore I am.
  • Walt Disney believed in dreaming. His verb won him 22 Academy Awards!  “I DREAM, therefore I am!”

Alex said, “it’s a one-word language that moves people and causes permanent and positive change!”

So – what’s your verb?  Alex asked us to pick our verb and put it on a sticky note.  I chose “collaborate” but my wife, Beth, told me that she didn’t think that was my verb!  I said, “what do you mean, my business is all about collaboration.”  She said yes that is how I operate but that is not the big picture of what I do.  I asked her what she thought I did and she said – “you inspire.”  She said that Alex told us that our verb had to be something BIG.  It had to be the big movement that we have with the people we work with.  Beth said that my role is to inspire people to collaborate.   I’d like to think she was right so – my verb is “INSPIRE.”

What is your verb?  Think BIG.  It’s the big movement that you make in your community and your world.  What is your verb and why?  Share it here.  I want to know.

shades

10 Shades of a Referral by Tiffanie Kellog

Guest Video Blog:

Tiffanie Kellog, a trainer with Asentiv and author of 4 1/2 Networking Mistakes, share the Ten shades of a referral.

The higher the shade of referral, the better the chances that you more likely to close the business for someone else.

What shade of referrals are you passing to others?
What is the lowest shade you are willing to take from someone?

The Top Characteristics of a Great Networker (pt 1)

Many people offer advice about what it takes to be a great networker (myself amongst them).  One thing that is left out of that equation, however, is what other people think about what it takes to be a great networker.  Networking involves interacting with others. So what do “they” think it takes to be a great networker?  This is important because we all need to be cognizant of other people’s expectations and adjust our behavior accordingly if we want to make the kind of impression that will work to build a powerful personal network.

Recently, I took the opportunity to gather almost 3,400 survey responses from business people around the world.   I gave them a list of almost 20 different characteristics on networking and I asked them to pick the top behaviors they’d like to see.  From those responses, I have identified the top characteristics of what people believe makes a great networker and have listed them here.

  1. Good Listener. At the top of the list is being a good listener.  Our success in networking depends on how well we can listen and learn. The faster you and your networking partner learn what you need to know about each other, the faster you’ll establish a valuable relationship. A good networker has two ears and one mouth and should use them both proportionately.  Listen to people’s needs and concerns and find opportunities to help them.  You can’t help others if you don’t know what they need, and you find that out by listening. In many ways, networking is about connecting the dots but to do that you have to listen so that you can help people make the connections they are looking for.
  1. Positive attitude. The first thing that people see from you is your attitude, how you take things in general. A consistently negative attitude makes people dislike you and drives away referrals; a positive attitude makes people want to associate and cooperate with you. Positive business professionals are like magnets.  Others want to be around them and will send their friends and family to them.
  1. Helps Others/Collaborative. People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.  Helping people shows that you care.  One survey respondent said that “people want to network with individuals who have a collaborative attitude.”  Helping others can be done in a variety of ways, from clipping a helpful article and emailing it to someone, to putting them in touch with a person who can help them with a specific challenge.  Several respondents commented about not wanting to network with people who are “in it for themselves.” A willingness to collaborate and help others is essential as it builds trust and helps establish a strong relationship.

Check out my blog next month for more characteristics of what people believe makes a great networker.

John Maxwell interview

John Maxwell Interviews Ivan Misner on “Networking”

In this video, I discuss with John Maxwell about checking your checkbook and calendar priorities and how to build your business by building relationships. I also share how I reverse engineer my goals.  Finally, we discussed coaching vs. mentoring and “Farming vs. Hunting”. Please click on the photo below to watch the video of my personal interview with John Maxell.

 

John Maxwell interview

John Maxwell Interviews Ivan Misner

Ivan Misner on “Networking” from The John Maxwell Team on Vimeo.

 

Chernobyl Cheese

Chernobyl Cheese – defined as cheese that can survive a nuclear disaster.

I’ve been wanting to write about my “Chernobyl Cheese” experience for a while now. Since my wife and I are currently working on the final draft of our Misner Plan recipe book, I thought this might be a good time.

Back in 2013, we transitioned from our home in Southern California to a home in Austin, Texas. In late 2014, we moved all of our remaining furnishings out of the Southern California home. I checked the contents of the refrigerator to make sure it was empty. Much to my surprise, I discovered a small, opened (but resealed shut) bag of sliced cheese which had been sitting in the back of a drawer in the refrigerator for a year! An entire year!!! The “sell by” date was September 7, 2013!

I thought to myself, “don’t look at it – it’s going to be a petri dish in a bag.” I need to go out and get an HAZMAT suit before I handle this infectious item. But, I couldn’t help myself, and I peeked. I was expecting to spontaneously utter some line out of Apocalypse Now like… “The horror, the horror.” But, instead, to my surprise – the cheese looked great! Not a single fungal-like substance to be seen. Actually, it looked as fresh as the day we bought it.

How could that possibly be? Real cheese doesn’t hold-up in a refrigerator for a year – even if it is in a zip-sealed bag. The answer – processed food is not real food. It may have some food-like ingredients but it certainly doesn’t behave like real food does. Real food typically doesn’t last in a fridge for more than a year. One of the fundamental elements of the Misner Plan is: “Eat real food.”

For those of you following my journey into health, be on the lookout for our upcoming book: Healing Begins in the Kitchen, which should be released in a few months.

We seriously considered naming the book “Cure Yourself Before You Kill Yourself,” but the lawyers didn’t approve of that title!

I’d love to hear your food- or health-related stories. Comment below.

goal setting

Goal Setting 2017

Video Blog:

If you want to be successful in both business and in life, you will need to take time for some goal setting: set targets and have metrics in place to monitor these goals on a regular basis to track your progress.

Select a target to aim at. Then, reverse engineer your goals by counting back each month from your 1-year and 5-year goals and track your progress. Take time to regularly create and review your goals for success.

Happy New Year!

website

New Website Announcement

I am excited to announce that my website has been updated

– Modern new look
– Mobile compatibility
– Search for topics
– Subscribe for email notifications when a new blog is posted on IvanMisner.com

My new website has the following tabs for more information

HOME (BLOGS)

BIO

ORGANIZATIONS

SPEAKING

BOOKS

CONTACT

website

Dr. Misner’s Professional Blog

Thank you to Sean Fernandes and your team at Scion for creating my new website.

 

Shawn Yesner and Tiffanie Kellog

Tips About Asking for Referrals by Tiffanie Kellog and Shawn Yesner

Guest Video Blog:

Tiffanie Kellog, a trainer with Asentiv and author of 4 1/2 Networking Mistakes, interviews Shawn Yesner of Yesner Law in Tampa, FL about asking for referrals.

Are you wondering why you are not getting referrals?
You need to be specific to become terrific. Just like when you order your favorite soda.

Click here to watch the video

John Maxwell

John Maxwell Interviews Ivan Misner on “Building Relationships”

In this video, I share with John Maxwell how BNI started with my personal need to build my business with referrals. I also share who are my mentors and the philosophy of Givers Gain.  Finally, we discussed how you should make decisions based on the information you are provided WITHIN the context of your value system. Please click on the photo below to watch the video of my personal interview with John Maxell.

John Maxwell interview

John Maxwell Interviews Ivan Misner on “Building Relationships”

Ivan Misner on “Building Relationships”

from The John Maxwell Team on Vimeo.

monorail

Technology and My 8-Year-Old Self

It was a crowded day at the Toronto airport as I was walking to my gate recently. On the way, I heard a soft but steady swooshing sound coming up behind me. I looked up to see a red monorail drive on by above me. I immediately had a monumental flashback to my first visit to Disneyland circa 1964. I was roughly 8 years old and was in awe of all the amazing things that I witnessed, most of which was in of the Tomorrowland exhibits.

monorail

The Disney monorail was the first daily operating monorail in the United States. In my flashback to my early visit to the park, I remembered wondering if something like this would ever be commonplace. It was amazing to see it operating in Toronto and going right through the building much like it did in Tomorrowland many years ago.

As I stood there watching the monorail go on by, I realized that during that same visit (or one soon after), I also spent time gawking at the first ‘push button’ telephones and first ‘touch screen’ computer monitor (it had 9 sections and all you could do was play tic tac toe). The push button phones transitioned into daily use in the following decade but the touch screen technology took many more years to become commonplace.

It makes me want to go back to Disneyland to see what the future holds for the next generation. What technology did you first see at a Disney Park or World Fair? I’d love to hear about your experience.

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