Ivan Misner, Author at Dr. Ivan Misner®
Raymond Aaron

Raymond Aaron shares his “10-10-10 PROGRAM”

Fellow Transformational Leadership Council member and friend, Raymond Aaron, discusses his “10-10-10 PROGRAM™” with me in this video.
X

Raymond Aaron is a personal friend and I absolutely love this program. Be A Branding Superstar, Eliminate Competition, & Increase Your Prices Effortlessly by writing your book with his 10-10-10 program.
X

What is the best way to improve your brand? Become a published author!

When you write your book, you are NOT selling your book, you are selling YOU and improving your name. You write the content and Raymond will help you with the marketing messages to build your brand.

  • Raymond will assign his own Personal Book Architect to you
  • He will help you to get a Perfect Topic and Title
  • Learn the Perfect Book Length
  • You have ONE YEAR to complete the 10-10-10 Program™
  • You will have more Authority, even before your book is done
  • Using the 10-10-10 Program™ Ghost Writing Protocol, Raymond will write the Foreword for your book
  • Once your Book is written, Raymond will publish your book
  • Raymond will also publish any subsequent book you will ever write
  • Raymond will list your book for sale on www.Amazon.com and you keep all the proceeds
  • At his own expense, Raymond will host your Official Book Launch to promote you and your book, where you sell your book and keep 100% of the sales

http://10-10-10program.com/

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Please click this button to have a 10-10-10 PROGRAM™” expert contact you on how you can get started. When they do, say the code “IVAN” and get 50% discount.

 

Life is much too precious to postpone. It’s time to put yourself in your own story and write your book. The whole world changes when you have a book. 
opportunity cost

The Opportunity Cost of Saying Yes

Although we love to say yes as often as possible, sometimes the opportunity cost of saying yes is too great. In these cases, try to be at peace with your decision to say no and realize you are protecting entry into your room. Say no and then move on knowing that you made the right decision for you. To network well, you really need to learn how to help people, build relationships, and support your connections in some way. But sometimes, just sometimes, you need to also say “no” to requests that are made of you.

Don’t Seinfeld it.

One of the really funny tropes from the old TV series, Seinfeld, is how the characters go off on some crazy subterfuge or complicated ruse that ends up getting them in more trouble than if they had just been candid in the first place. Be polite but be honest and be direct.

Propose something else.

If you are unable to do something that you’re being asked to do, offer them something else instead. For example, I am always having people ask me to send some communication out to my entire mailing list. The answer is always “no.”  However, with people I know and trust, I propose something else. I propose that I post it on my social media instead. That generally works just as well to maintain the relationship.

When you say it, mean it!

Be a broken record. Sometimes, people don’t take “no” for an answer. I try to be polite and smile, and repeat what I said before (on some occasions, I’ve repeated myself three times before they realized I really meant it).

say no

Ways to Say “No” Without Sounding Like a Jerk

It’s important to recognize when someone’s opportunity is your distraction. These are generally situations where someone’s project is not on mission for your business or your life. In these situations, you need to learn how to say no.  The word “no” is a one-word sentence. It’s just not a full sentence that I like to use very often and I think there are a fair number of people like me out there.

Don’t get me wrong, I am totally good with saying “no,” to people when it is necessary. The secret is: how do you say “no” without sounding like you don’t care?

If I said yes, I’d let you down.

A very effective way to tell someone “no” is to tell them that you believe that you’d let them down if you do what they are asking. It might be because you don’t have the bandwidth, the knowledge, or the expertise to do what they are asking. In any case, you’re not the person to help make this idea a success and you don’t want to disappoint them.

Recognize the difference between an opportunity and a distraction.

That begins by knowing your own personal or professional mission. If you know your purpose/expertise/mission then you can say “no” when someone comes to you with something that is a distraction to that mission. I do this all the time by telling people that my mission is to do X. As interesting as their idea is, it’s not something that fits with what I do.

Refer them to someone more qualified.

When I say “no” to someone, I almost always try to refer them to someone who is more qualified or more suited to help that person.  I also try to refer them to someone who’s mission is more in alignment with their project.

To network well, you really need to learn how to help people, build relationships, and support your connections in some way. But sometimes, just sometimes, you need to also say “no” to requests that are made of you.

 

incentive program

Final Thoughts About Your Referral Incentive Program

To meet the challenge of finding the right incentive program, tap into the assistance and insights of other people.  An effective way to do this is to invite about ten people you know to meet with you.  Include a representative sample of your customers/clients/patients, business associates, partners, and friends.  Their purpose is to think up incentives you could offer to produce a larger word-of-mouth-based business. Host a lunch or dinner for the group and either take copious notes or tape-record the meeting.  Invite those who are willing to donate about two hours for your benefit (and receive a free meal, of course).

Prepare yourself, well in advance of the group meeting.  Think the subject over beforehand so you have an idea of the limits that you may need to set for an incentive program, such as cost, duration, appropriateness, etc.  Have water, note pads, a preliminary questionnaire, sample materials, a flip chart, and even a few ideas to get the ball rolling.  If you’re going to discuss a product, bring actual samples to give the group a point of reference.

Begin the actual session by clearly stating a specific problem.  Make sure your group understands that the incentive has to be geared to the group you’ve targeted.  Explain that you are looking for a variety of ideas and that you won’t make any immediate decisions.

An accountant in St. Louis thanks those who successfully refer a client to him by paying for a dinner or two at least one hour’s drive from their homes.  This approach firmly plants the accountant in the minds of his referral sources:  they won’t be able to use it right away because the distance requires that they plan for it.  As the date approaches, because it has been planned, they’ll be talking about it, and probably about the accountant.  Later, when the referring party runs into someone else who might need an accountant, who will he recommend?

I’ve heard many novel ways businesspeople reward those who send them referrals.  A female consultant sends bouquets of flowers to men.  A music store owner sends concert tickets.  A financial planner sends change purses and money clips. Please share below in the comments about how you reward others who send you referrals.

someday

Sam Horn shares “Someday Is Not a Day in the Week”

Fellow Transformational Leadership Council member and friend, Sam Horn, discusses her book, “Someday Is Not a Day in the Week” with me in this video.
X

Sam is a personal friend and I absolutely love this book. Full of inspirational insights and advice, lifehacks, and real-world examples, “Someday is Not a Day in the Week” will help readers get what they want in life today rather than “someday.”
X

 Download the Kindle version of this book by Sam Horn on Amazon

Are you planning to do what makes you happy someday when you have more time, money, or freedom?

What if someday never happens? As the Buddha said, “The thing is, we think we have time.” Sam Horn is a woman on a mission about not waiting for SOMEDAY … and this is her manifesto. Her dad’s dream was to visit all the National Parks when he retired. He worked six to seven days a week for decades. A week into his long-delayed dream, he had a stroke. Sam doesn’t want that to happen to you. She took her business on the road for a Year by the Water. During her travels, she asked people, “Do you like your life? Your job? If so, why? If not, why not?”

The surprising insights about what makes people happy or unhappy, what they’re doing about it (or not), and why…will inspire you to carve out time for what truly matters now, not later.

Life is much too precious to postpone. It’s time to put yourself in your own story. The good news is, there are “hacks” you can do right now to make your life more of what you want it to be. And you don’t have to be selfish, quit your job, or win the lottery to do them. Sam Horn offers actionable, practical advice in short, snappy chapters to show you how to get started on your best life ― now.
incentive program

Incentive Program for Referrals

When you offer any type of discount or novelty item as an incentive program for referrals, keep in mind what your cost would be to generate a new client from scratch. These costs include the cost of printed literature, advertisements, sales calls, telephone time, meetings, appointments, and so forth.  You can readily see that the cost of gaining a new client through a referral incentive program is almost always lower.

Incentive programs also help you sell more products or services more frequently to your existing customer base; again, these are sales that are generated at a far lower marketing cost and effort. No matter what form of incentive program you use, the fact that you offer incentives means that your potential for generating word-of-mouth business will increase.  The question is, what type of incentive will work for you?

Some health care professionals offer a free visit when a referral becomes a new patient.  Other business professionals send small gift baskets, bottles of wine, flowers, or certificates for their services or the services of other businesses in the community.  Depending on the type of product or service you offer and the relationship with your referring parties, you may also employ the following:

Incentive Program Examples

  • Free estimates, samples, or analyses
  • Additional products or services for no extra cost
  • Product or service discounts
  • Product or service time extensions
  • Extended telephone consultation privileges
  • Extended or life memberships
  • Exclusive or charter memberships
  • Group discounts
  • Extended warranties
  • Reduced costs on peripheral items or services.

Creativity is the key to any good incentive program.  People just naturally like to help each other, but especially when they know their efforts are successful.  Let your contact know when a referral he or she has made comes through, and be as creative as you can.

Ken Honda

Ken Honda shares “Happy Money”

Fellow Transformational Leadership Council member and friend, Ken Honda, discusses his book, “Happy Money” with me in this video.
X

Ken Honda is a personal friend and I absolutely love this book. What Marie Kondo’s The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up did for your living space, Ken Honda’s Happy Money will do for your wallet. This book isn’t here to fix you, because as Ken Honda says, you’re already okay!
X

Order this book by Ken Honda on Amazon: https://amzn.to/2YrJiMe

Ken Honda—Japan’s #1 bestselling personal development guru—knows that getting rich quick is no way to achieve happiness. Too often, money is a source of fear, stress, and anger, sometimes breaking apart relationships and even ruining lives. We like to think money is just a number or a piece of paper, but it is so much more than that. Money has the ability to smile; its energy changes when it is given with a certain feeling, and this energy impacts not only ourselves but others as well. Although Ken Honda is often called a “money guru,” his real job over the past decade has been to help others discover the tools they already possess to heal their own lives and relationships with money. In Happy Money the “Zen millionaire” explains, in practical and accessible language, how to achieve peace of mind when it comes to money.
 
 X
X
Learn how to treat money as a welcome guest, allowing it to come and go with respect and without resentment; understand and improve your Money EQ; unpack the myth of scarcity; and embrace the process of giving money, not just receiving it.
creative incentives

Do Creative Incentives Work?

You can greatly enhance your word-of-mouth based business by designing creative incentives for people to give you referrals.  Yet of all the key techniques for making the system work, wanting to give referral rewards bonuses to individuals who pass out your business cards and obtain new clients for your business seems to frustrate others the most.

Historically, finder’s fees or referral rewards have been used as an incentive for giving someone referrals.  Although finder’s fees can be appropriate, I don’t believe they are necessarily the best technique to employ in most situations.  Here is an excellent example of a non-monetary incentive system:

Sign of the Times

Years ago I went to my chiropractor for a routine adjustment.  Several weeks before, I had referred a friend to him who had recently been in an accident.  As I walked into the waiting room, I noticed a bulletin board that was displayed prominently on the wall.  The bulletin board read, “We would like to thank the following patients for referring someone to us last month.”

Actually, there was nothing unusual about this sign.  It had been there on each of my previous visits, except this time my name was posted on it.  I took notice and was pleased, but didn’t give it a second thought, until a month later, when I returned and saw that my name was no longer on it.  Instantly I thought, Who else can I refer to the doctor so that my name will be put back up on the board?  For the record, I did come up with another referral for the good doctor.

Something like this may not work for everyone.  But if it worked on me, I’m sure it will have a positive effect on others.  The key is to select several incentive options so as to impact as many people as possible.

Business Cards

Why Collecting Business Cards is Not Networking

One of the biggest mistakes people make when networking is thinking that it’s just about running around the room collecting as many business cards as possible. These are often people who don’t really like networking. However, they know they have to do it, and they think this is the best way to get it done. I’ve tried telling them that this is not networking — it’s either face-to-face cold calling or worse yet, it’s simply “card collecting” or being a “Card Dealer“.

Years ago, I ran into a couple of business partners who made a competition of collecting cards at networking events. The person who collected the least number of cards had to buy the other partner dinner that week. They were very proud of this networking strategy — seriously, they bragged about it to me. I tried to tell them that this was really not a good networking strategy. I don’t think they ever got it.

Unfortunately, I still find myself running into people who think this is a great approach to networking effectively. My co-author of Networking Like a Pro, Brian Hilliard, has given me the solution to dealing with this issue.

Barley’s Tale

Brian has a dog whose name is Barley. He’s a 55-pound Shiba Inu, which means he doesn’t like cats and he looks like a fox. Barley is a very well-trained, well-behaved dog. If you’d like to collect business cards at an event but you don’t want to spend all that time collecting the cards, here’s what you can do. You can hire Barley from Brian ($20/hour, two hour minimum + travel) to attend your next event. Brian will put a satchel around him, like a horse. And on one side he’ll place a stack of your business cards, along with a sign that says “Take One” and on the other side he’ll have a pocket that says “Leave Your Card Here.”

Brian will then drive Barley up to the event, send him into the room, and return two hours later to collect Barley and his new stack of business cards. I’m confident he’ll come out with a big stack because he’s very well trained and people really love him.

Now after you take those cards from his side pocket — and make sure to walk him, since he’ll probably need to use the restroom after all of that hard work — will he have truly networked?

Of course not! How could he possibly have networked by getting a stack of business cards?

Collecting business cards at a networking event is not networking

It sounds ridiculous, but that’s how more than a few business professionals approach their networking. It’s like a game of who can get the most cards, and it doesn’t make any sense. Collecting cards at a networking event is not networking — it’s card collecting — which is not a profitable way to build your business. If you put this in the context of Barley running around the event letting people exchange cards with him, it seems obvious.  However, if you’re still on the fence and would like to contact Brian about potentially contracting Barley’s services, please feel free to do so.

Finder’s Fees

Do Finder’s Fees Work?

Historically, finder’s fees or referral rewards have been used as an incentive for giving someone referrals.  Although finder’s fees can be appropriate, I don’t believe they are necessarily the best technique to employ in most situations.  Here is an excellent example of a non-monetary incentive system:

One Realtor I met in Northern California told me that for almost six years he had offered a one-hundred-dollar finder’s fee to anyone giving him a referral that led to a listing or sale.  However, he said that in all that time he had given only about a dozen finder’s fees, so he decided to try another kind of incentive.

Living on a large parcel of land in prime wine country, he had begun growing grapes on his own vineyard.  Therefore, a thought occurred to him:  Why not take the next step?  He began processing the grapes and bottling his own special vintage wine.  After his first harvest, he had a graphic artist design a beautiful label, which he affixed to each bottle.  Instructing all his friends that he did not sell this wine, he gave it as a gift to anyone providing him with a bona fide referral.

The Realtor gave away dozens of cases in the first three years – half the time it took him to give only one dozen cash finder’s fees.  Yet each bottle of wine cost him less than ten dollars to produce.  Therefore, this special vintage wine makes him infinitely more money than giving away a handful of hundred-dollar finder’s fees. I got a call from the Realtor and he shared me this story…

Success Uncorked

“Last Friday I got a phone call from a woman I didn’t know.  Out of the blue she gave me two referrals.  As I wrote down the information, I asked her how she had heard of me.

“She said, ‘I had dinner last night at a friend’s house.  He served wine.  I took a sip.  “Wow, great wine!” I told him.  “Where did you buy it?”  “You can’t buy it,” he said.  “The only way you can get it is to give this real estate agent a referral.”

“’I have two referrals,’ she said.  ‘Can I get two bottles?’

“So I gladly sent her two bottles.  Furthermore, both referrals turned into more business, and each of them cost me only ten dollars.”

It sometimes amazes me, even now, how something as simple as a bottle of wine can be such a powerful incentive for people to give you referrals.  But the explanation is really quite simple:  because it’s special.  A bottle of wine that can’t be bought can be worth ten times what it cost to produce when traded for something as valuable as a business referral.

Networking Mentor

The Networking Mentor

 

I have a newly revised book, The Networking Mentor, that is now available on Amazon. It was just released this week!

“The Networking Mentor” is a parable about the transformation of someone’s life because another person took them under their wing and mentored them relating to the do’s and don’ts of networking. It starts with a struggling business owner, Ken, who is invited to a BNI networking group by a business associate. He proceeds to mentor Ken and helps him learn how to network effectively and build a referral-based business. Ken’s mentor teaches him very specific strategies on how to network better and at the same time, the mentor improves his skill set as well.

Each and every one of us have people in our lives who made a difference. We all have someone in our story who influenced the path we took—or perhaps motivated us to carve our own path. These are the mentors we’ve had in our life. Their impact can be life-changing. We firmly believe in the power of mentors to make a positive difference in the lives of others. By devoting time and attention to a mentoring relationship, both parties reap deeply powerful and meaningful rewards that extend well beyond simple financial gain. As we mature and gain more experience, we have the opportunity to transition from mostly being a mentee to also being a mentor. This book is for both mentors and mentees. This book is the second edition of a book originally titled: “I Love Networking.” It has been expanded with additional chapters and graphics.

Please use this link to order your own copy of this amazing book.

https://tinyurl.com/TheNetworkingMentor

Every person that believes in mentoring new members in their network needs copies of this book. It is the story of how a mentoring relationship changed someone’s life in a BNI group. We’ve all had mentors who are in “our story”. When we talk about how our life has changed through our experiences with them, they are part of that story. Mentors can make a positive difference in someone’s life. By devoting time and attention to a mentoring relationship, both parties reap deeply powerful and meaningful rewards that extend well beyond simple financial gain. As we gain more experience, we have the opportunity to transition from being a mentee to also being a mentor. We’ve all had mentors who are in “our story”. However, there is something even more important: The real question is not who’s in our story but whose story are we in? Whose life have we made a difference in? That’s what creates a meaningful life, and that’s why this book is for both mentees and mentors.

So, I have two questions for you.  Whose story are you in as their mentor and how have you helped someone else?  Who is in your story as a special mentor to you in your life or business? Share your story here on my blog.  I’d really like to hear it.  Post it below in the comments.

choices

Work Hard and Make Better Choices

Working hard is only the first part of success.  Making good choices is the second part.  It truly takes both to achieve success at whatever you do.

I knew someone who was constantly lamenting her “bad luck”.  She wasn’t happy with the various jobs that she had over the years, her personal life was a shambles, she was almost thirty, hadn’t completed college, and constantly had money problems.  She often blamed situations or other people for the various predicaments that she was in.  However, the glaringly obvious truth was that although she worked fairly hard, she continually made horrible choices.  One day she would complain about money and then the next day she’d buy something totally extravagant and completely unnecessary.  The next week she’d complain about not being able to get a good job while showing up to work an hour late for personal reasons (which happened regularly).

From time to time she’d talk to me about her issues and I’d point out the choices she made that led to the current problem at hand.  Each time she’d pay lip service to acknowledge the connection, but the truth is she never took ownership for the real problem – her choices.  She once lamented “why me, why me, I deserve better!”  I didn’t offer my opinion on this question, but what I wanted to tell her was that “everyone feels like they ‘deserve better’ at some point in their life – get over it, stop complaining and start really doing something about it.  Work hard and make better choices!”

I’ve had the opportunity during my career to work with thousands of people who have experienced varying degrees of success in their lives.  Success is not an entitlement. One of the recurring themes I see with these people is that they plan their work and work their plan. That is, they think through their choices, make the best ones they can with the information they have, and then work hard to carry those choices out.

The Secret to My Luck

Not long ago I was talking to someone I’ve known for years about the growth of my business and some other personal goals I’ve recently met and he said, “Man you’re lucky.  It must be nice.”

I responded to him by saying “Yea, I’m lucky, let me tell you the secret to my luck…”

“First, I went to college for ten years.  During that time, I started my own business and worked really long hours for two decades.  Along the way, I mortgaged my house a couple of times for the business and I wrote five books.  You too can have this kind of luck.  All you need to do is apply this kind of effort to whatever you do and you can be just as lucky.”

He laughed and said, “Okay, Okay, I get it!!”  Did he really get it?  I don’t think so, because he hasn’t changed his behavior or started making different choices.  If being successful was easy – everyone would have the success they think they deserve.

Working hard is only the first part of success. Making good choices is the second part.  It truly takes both to achieve success at whatever you do.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
1 2 3 104
   Follow Me

Get every new post delivered to your inbox